I’m a Small Biz 100 for 2019

UK’S TOP ‘SMALL BIZ 100’ UNVEILED BY SMALL BUSINESS SATURDAY

A Soft Tissue and ScarWork clinic from Crowborough, East Sussex has been selected as one of 100 trail-blazing small businesses in the official count-down to Small Business Saturday, which takes place across the UK on 7 December 2019.

Recover Repeat Soft Tissue & ScarWork is one of this year’s ‘Small Biz 100’, a selection of small businesses drawn from every corner of the UK that reflect the vibrancy of the UK’s 5.6 million small businesses. In the 100 days running up to Small Business Saturday, the campaign will spotlight each of the Small Biz 100, as part of its mission to celebrate small business success and encourage the nation to ‘shop local’ and support British small businesses.

This year’s Small Biz 100 features a range of unique independent businesses each contributing to their communities and offering something different, including Recover Repeat Soft Tissue & ScarWork, founded in 2015 by Kerry White. Kerry is a Level 5 Sports Massage and Remedial Soft Tissue Therapist who specialises in ScarWork. Soft Tissue work isn’t just for ‘Sporty people’ – it can help reduce pain in anyone and helps us all to move with increased freedom. ScarWork is a specialist form of soft tissue work which aims to improve scars caused either by surgery or by misadventure. It is an incredibly gentle hands-on technique, which when combined with soft tissue work, can make long lasting changes.

Recover Repeat Soft Tissue & ScarWork joins hundreds of previous Small Biz 100 businesses, which have been announced by the iconic campaign since its UK launch in 2013.

Day one of the Small Biz 100 count-down kicks off with The Butchers Social, from Henley-in-Arden, Warwickshire, with Recover Repeat Soft Tissue & ScarWork being placed in the spotlight on Monday 7th October 2019, where it will be celebrating by offering free 15 min scar assessments throughout ‘Scar-tober’ at the clinic in Crowborough*. Head over to www.recover-repeat.co.uk for more information.

Founder of Recover Repeat Soft Tissue and ScarWork, Kerry White said:

“I am hugely excited to be a part of the SmallBiz 100 for 2019. There is a wealth of specialist skills and fantastic service buried within small businesses up and down the country and this opportunity allows some of those hidden gems to be spotlighted. On a personal level, it’s great to be part of the group and have that richness of small business experience to call on to help grow my own unique brand and service.

Director of Small Business Saturday, Michelle Ovens MBE said:

“Each year this campaign has grown in support from government, business and communities alike, and so we can’t wait to begin the annual 100-day countdown to Small Business Saturday with the launch of the Small Biz 100 2019.

“Small Business Saturday’s increasing popularity means it was harder than ever to choose just 100 of this country’s incredible 5.6 million small businesses to showcase, but we believe those we have chosen are true representatives of the diverse, creative and inspiring heroes at the heart of our communities.”

In its seventh year, Small Business Saturday is the UK’s most successful small business campaign, which last year saw an estimated £812 million spent in small businesses across the UK on the day, according to research commissioned by founder and principal supporter American Express.

This was up from the £748 million spent on Small Business Saturday in 2017, with 59% of people aware of the day saying they spent more than usual.

The #SmallBizSatUK campaign trended in the UK top 5 on Twitter on the day, reaching over 100 million people globally.

The Prime Minister, the Chancellor of the Exchequer and the Mayor of London were among those publicly supporting the campaign, alongside more than 90% of local councils.

Small Business Saturday also benefits from the backing of leading business organisations including the Federation of Small Businesses, Indeed and Dell. The campaign is also supported by Amazon, printed.com, Square and Xero.

Small Business Saturday 2019 is open to all businesses to participate in and will commence its regional bus tour roadshow across the UK during the autumn, to drum up further support.

The full list of businesses chosen for the Small Biz 100 can be found in notes below.

– Ends –

Notes to Editors

Media Contacts

Seven Hills (on behalf of Small Business Saturday) smallbusinesssaturday@wearesevenhills.com

About Small Business Saturday

A grassroots, not-for-profit campaign, Small Business Saturday was originally founded by American Express in the U.S. in 2010. American Express remains the principal supporter of the campaign in the UK, as part of its on-going commitment to encourage consumers to shop small.

The day itself takes place on the first Saturday in December each year, but the campaign aims to have a lasting impact on small businesses.

On Small Business Saturday, customers across the UK go out and support all types of small businesses, online, in offices and in stores. Many small businesses take part in the day by hosting events and offering discounts.

 

More information on Small Business Saturday can also be found at:

Facebook.com/smallbusinesssaturdayuk

Twitter – @SmallBizSatUk

Website – https://smallbusinesssaturdayuk.com/

Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

Do you get a sharp, debilitating pain in your shoulder when you are performing tasks like brushing your hair, putting on certain clothes or showering? During these movements, where you raise your arm out to the side and then upwards over your head, do you alternate between no pain and pain?

For example, during the first part of the moment you don’t feel any pain, and then suddenly your shoulder “catches” and there is sharp pain, followed by no pain again as you continue to move your arm upwards. These are all signs of a condition called Shoulder Impingement Syndrome (SIS).

Shoulder Injury

SIS occurs where the tendons of the rotator cuff muscles that stabilise your shoulder get trapped as they pass through the shoulder joint in a narrow bony space called the sub-acromial space. Impingement means to impact or encroach on bone, and repeated pinching and irritation of these tendons and the bursa (the padding under the shoulder bone) can lead to injury and pain.

 Shoulder complaints are the third most common musculoskeletal problem after back and neck disorders. The highest incidence is in women and people aged 45–64 years. Of all shoulder disorders, shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS) accounts for 36%, making it the most common shoulder injury. You shouldn’t experience impingement with normal shoulder function. When it does happen, the rotator cuff tendon becomes inflamed and swollen, a condition called rotator cuff tendonitis. Likewise, if the bursa becomes inflamed, you could develop shoulder bursitis. You can experience these conditions either on their own, or at the same time. The injury can vary from mild tendon inflammation (tendonitis), bursitis (inflamed bursa), calcific tendonitis (bone forming within the tendon) through to partial and full thickness tendon tears, which may require surgery.

 Over time the tendons can thicken due to repeated irritation, perpetuating the problem as the thicker tendons battle to glide through the narrow bony subacromial space. The tendons can even degenerate and change in microscopic structure, with decreased circulation within the tendon resulting in a chronic tendonosis.

Shoulder Anatomy Image

What Causes Shoulder Impingement?

Generally, SIS is caused by repeated, overhead movement of your arm into the “impingement zone,” causing the rotator cuff to contact the outer tip of the shoulder blade (acromion). When this repeatedly occurs, the swollen tendon is trapped and pinched under the acromion. The condition is frequently called Swimmer’s Shoulder or Thrower’s Shoulder, since the injury occurs from repetitive overhead activities. Injury could also stem from simple home chores, like hanging washing on the line or a repetitive activity at work. In other cases, it can be caused by traumatic injury, like a fall.

Shoulder impingement has primary (structural) and secondary (posture & movement related) causes. Primary Rotator Cuff Impingement is due to a structural narrowing in the space where the tendons glide. Osteoarthritis, for example, can cause the growth of bony spurs, which narrow the space. With a smaller space, you are more likely to squash and irritate the underlying soft tissues (tendons and bursa).

Secondary Rotator Cuff Impingement is due to an instability in the shoulder girdle. This means that there is a combination of excessive joint movement, ligament laxity and muscle weakness around the shoulder joint. Poor stabilisation of the shoulder blade by the surrounding muscles changes the physical position of the bones in the shoulder, which in turn increases the risk of tendon impingement. Other causes can include weakening of the rotator cuff tendons due to overuse, for example in throwing and swimming, or muscle imbalances between the shoulder muscles.

What are the Symptoms of Shoulder Impingement?

  • An arc of shoulder pain approximately when your arm is at shoulder height and/ or when your arm is overhead
  • Shoulder pain that can extend from the top of the shoulder down the arm to the elbow
  • Pain when lying on the sore shoulder, night pain and disturbed sleep
  • Shoulder pain at rest as your condition worsens
  • Muscle weakness or pain when attempting to reach or lift
  • Pain when putting your hand behind your back or head
  • Pain reaching for the seat-belt, or out of the car window for a parking ticket

Who Suffers from Shoulder Impingement?

Impingement syndrome is more likely to occur in people who engage in physical activities that require repeated overhead arm movements, such as tennis, golf, swimming, weight lifting, or throwing a ball. Occupations that require repeated overhead lifting or work at or above shoulder height also increase the risk of rotator cuff impingement.

 How is Shoulder Impingement Diagnosed?

Shoulder impingement can be diagnosed by your physical therapist using some specific manual tests. An ultrasound scan may be useful to detect any associated injuries such as shoulder bursitis, rotator cuff tears, calcific tendonitis or shoulder tendinopathies. Finally, an x-ray can be used to see any bony spurs that may have formed and narrowed the subacromial space.

What Does The Treatment Involve?

There are many structures that can be injured in shoulder impingement syndrome. How the impingement occurred is the most important question to answer. This is especially important if the onset was gradual, since your static and dynamic posture, muscle strength, and flexibility all have important roles to play. Your rotator cuff is an important group of muscles that control and stabilise the shoulder joint. It is essential the muscles around the thoracic spine and shoulder blade are also assessed and treated as these too work together with the entire shoulder girdle.

The early stages of treatment will involve manual therapy, including massage to relieve pain and release tight structures as well as mobilisation techniques to restore normal shoulder movement. Strapping/taping can be helpful in reducing pain as well as ultrasound and laser therapy. As you move through the other stages of treatment your therapist will prescribe rehabilitation exercises specific to your shoulder, posture, sport and/or work demands.

Corticosteroid injections can be useful in the initial pain relieving stage if conservative (non-surgical) methods fail to reduce the pain and inflammation. It is important to note that once your pain settles, it is important to assess your strength, flexibility, neck and thoracic spine involvement to ensure that your shoulder impingement does not return once your injection has worn off. Some shoulder impingements will respond positively and quickly to treatment; however many others can be incredibly stubborn and frustrating, taking between 3-6 months to resolve. There is no specific time frame for when to progress from each stage to the next. It is also important to note that each progression must be carefully monitored as attempting to progress too soon to the next level can lead to re-injury and frustration.
More information on shoulder pain can be found on the NHS website.


Thanks to Co-Kinetic Journal for the information